There’s no place like a child of InBetweeners

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I’m getting started on this blog which was begun to emphasize that there is a group of people that don’t fit into the mainstream’s interpretation of demographic group which I identified us as “The Inbetweeners” born 1960-65.

Lo and behold the image shown was shared on Linked In to help employers identify the likelihood of success based on the year they were born.  Huh?  Where are WE?  Especially those born 1960-63.  We don’t seriously belong as Baby Boomers.  We identify more with Gen X than anywhere, and these skills are clearly earmarked for us.

We stand out in areas such as

  • Generating revenue
  • Adaptability
  • Relationship Building
  • Problem Solving
  • Collaboration

It really shouldn’t be considered rocket science.  If you were the little sister or baby brother of a Baby Boomer, you’ve always had to rely on your personal resources, tenacity, relationships, solutions and collaborative ability to survive.

Like most parents, we pass on to our offspring the qualities we have while focussed on arming them with better skills than we were not fortunate to accumulate simply because our voice is muffled out by the former population boom, and the climbing noise coming from our children:  The Millennials.

I should not come off as a surprise that we would be forced to have the skills we’ve been identified by.  If you are at the tail end of a big blob of consumers, employees, siblings we have only gotten those skills like “adaptability” “relationship building” “problem solving” and “collaboration” in order to survive.

Add gender, race to the mix, and you fall further to the bottom of the heep.  Not from lack of trying, but from lack of opportunity.  All the best jobs were clutched by the Baby Boomers and when we hit our prime with all those wonderful attributes, we’re being passed over for the savvy Millennials.  How depressing … perhaps.  Perhaps not.

On my second blob, I shared those Inbetweeners who have risen to the top and because of how far they had to climb, are solid contenders for greatness.  Not always because of their history or skills, but more likely because when they were starting out, there was a massive hill to climb.

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Think about it.  Our Baby Boomer siblings and icons were born out of war, devastation and even poverty.  They created opportunity and optimism by force of will and the era unfolding:  you would get a job, regardless of education, likely work it for 40 some years, retiring with a plump nest egg and the least worry of all the generations combined.

Inbetweeners had to take the leftovers, make opportunity happen where it never existed, and try to live optimistically where we couldn’t feel entitlement, and were taught you had to work hard to accomplish anything and nothing was handed to us.

Not far behind, the children of Baby Boomers and Inbetweeners, have become the next population force called the Millennial generation.  The gap in between, called GenX, were the ones who survived in the 1990s and also likely passed over from Baby Boomers to Millennials.

Our current world is not nearly ideal as the Baby Boomers and not necessarily equipped for Millennials, who have glossed over Inbetweeners and GenX, formulated by entitlement.   Thankful maybe those Millennials born to the Inbetweeners, taught the right skills for survival:  relationships, flexibility, tech savviness, problem-solving with collaboration a distant finalist.   They didn’t have to rely on collaboration to get ahead.  Strong, smart, they forge ahead.  Prime for discussion by marketers, advertisers, educators and employers.

Our world is a rocky one.  Who is really equipped for survival?  I am biased, certainly, to think Inbetweeners will be because of what life had unfolded for them.  Born in the consumerism of the 1960s, the political upheaval and uncertainty of the 1960s, the background noise fluttering with a Vietnam war.  Our formative years clouded by the “ME” generation that said “US” to this population group.

We are the years of observers:  we got to watch how destructive drugs and alcoholism could be, the former by our siblings and the latter likely shown by our parents or authority figures.

Our greatest hope?  Our Millennial children.  Not the ones yet unemployed.  They saw their parents flux between employment and layoff multiple times.  They heed the importance of education, to give you a lift in a competitive, combative world of employment where nothing was guaranteed anymore.

The InBetweeners were not shown a world of constant optimism.  A struggle to be skeptical because we were born in the wave of anything is possible.

The hardships that befall many, are likely cast with the InBetweeners, but their resolute nature can be found inspiring.

The next successful bubble within a large bubble will befall the resolute children of InBetweeners … to those who heeded their parents’ struggles, promising to leverage the period of renewed optimism, sprinkled with reality.

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Fear will be a strong motivator.  Whether that fear stems from world chaos and violence, or poor life choices dulled by drugs and alcohol, the out-of-control adoption of online presence.  The winners will be that very small segment of Millennials who absorbed the wisdom of the InBetweener  which will allow them to soar.  Like generations before them, they will take what history has taught them, with renewed vows to make the world a better place, for all, regardless of race, color, religion or education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “There’s no place like a child of InBetweeners

  1. Pingback: Gen-X – Gen-Xing

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